Medical personnel get first-hand training

John Wareham/News Instructor Dan Crow, left, gives a test to Stan Hoptry of the Worthington Township Fire Department during an Advanced Stroke Life Support class Saturday at Kokosing Training Center in Fredericktown. The class taught to first responders and hospital personnel the best way to start immediate treatment on stroke victims.

John Wareham/News

Instructor Dan Crow, left, gives a test to Stan Hoptry of the Worthington Township Fire Department during an Advanced Stroke Life Support class Saturday at Kokosing Training Center in Fredericktown. The class taught to first responders and hospital personnel the best way to start immediate treatment on stroke victims.

FREDERICKTOWN — The OhioHealth Network held its regular Advanced Stroke Life Support (ASLS) class at the Kokosing Training Center in Fredericktown Saturday.

The group travels around the state to educate the various participants in the process of how to diagnose and treat different types of strokes.

The teachers and lecturers explained with talks and visual aids about how each level of care provider can start immediate treatment on a potential stroke victim and how they can try to minimize the damage and the rehab time as much as possible.

“Our goal is to improve communication between pre-hospital staff and hospital staff and try to get everybody on the same page, so we can have a system of stroke care that focuses on the responsibilities of each part of that chain as we bring a patient from the public into definitive care,” said Dan Crow, who was one of the teachers and lecturers at the class and is a lieutenant at the Mansfield Fire Department. “We really want to focus on getting patients to that care as quickly as possible because it results in reduced disability.”

The attendees of the class on Saturday were from a variety of places in the general area and hold several types of positions within emergency services. Among those in attendance were personnel from the Homer Fire/EMS, Bladensburg Fire, Delaware County and Morrow County EMS, Fredericktown EMS, Elm Valley Fire and Worthington Township Fire/EMS. The classes are taught to all levels including to doctors, nurses and other hospital personnel — all with the intent to ensure the patient gets the right attention as quickly as possible.

“Getting people back to living like they had before they had their stroke is the ultimate goal,” Crow said.

Crow and several other speakers took turns explaining the types of strokes and symptoms and how to identify them.

An ischemic stroke is a blood clot that forms somewhere in your body that gets to your brain and then cuts off circulation to parts of it.

Another common type is a hemorrhagic stroke, which is a burst blood vessel in your brain that is not due to some type of trauma, but due to a problem with the vessel itself — most often caused by high blood pressure. The hemorrhagic stroke has a higher risk of death associated with it where the ischemic ones have a higher risk of disability.
Both kinds are treated differently, whereas ischemic ones are treated with a high potent blood thinner called tPA or with a procedure called a thrombectomy, where they use a stent device to remove the clot manually. The only places that do a thrombectomy are called Comprehensive Stroke Centers, which are usually in larger cities with larger facilities.

“One of the goals to coming to places all around Ohio, like Fredericktown, is to get everybody in the same network so we do the best we can to get the patients to the facilities that have that treatment available. Because you can’t have a specialist who does that treatment at every single hospital,” Crow explained.

The team has a slogan that it goes by and it adheres to it as closely as it can.

Time is Brain, which translated to a formula. One minute equals one week of needed rehab.

“Any delay we have or any breakdown in communication ultimately that patient is going to lose more brain cells and have more disability,” Crow said.

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John Wareham: 740-397-5333 or john.wareham@mountvernonnews.com and on Twitter, @mountvernonnews

 

 

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