Joshua Morrison/ News The Fredericktown United Methodist Church is celebrating its 200th anniversary with events during the Fredericktown Tomato Show.

Joshua Morrison/Mount Vernon News

The Fredericktown United Methodist Church is celebrating its 200th anniversary with events during the Fredericktown Tomato Show. Request this photo

 

FREDERICKTOWN — The Fredericktown United Methodist Church, located at 123 Columbus Road, will be celebrating its 200th anniversary in September with activities during the Tomato Show, a Sunday dinner, and fundraising for its $2.4 million building project.

The first society of the FUMC was established in Fredericktown in 1818, although the first church wasn’t built until 1840, according to a history compiled and written by the church’s “Committee of History” in 1976. The building was built on the corner of North Chestnut and Sandusky streets — where the structure still stands today and is used as a dwelling.

After several years, the congregation outgrew the first structure, so a larger building was needed. In 1856, Joseph and Jane Beers sold property to the Fredericktown Methodist Church trustees that was near the Public Square. The new church was completed in 1857 and was dedicated in the fall of the same year. The building had three major remodeling projects in 1892, 1895, and 1905, that mostly consisted of inside changes and the addition of stained glass windows and the spire. This second church is now a historic building.

After the second building became too crowded yet again, the purchase of property on Columbus Road — where the current church now sits — was authorized in 1957 and groundbreaking took place in 1960. The following year, the Christian Education Building was consecrated, and the old church on public square was sold to the village to be used as a library.

Chelsea Olms/ News Chris Misencik-Bunn will also be donating two original works and five prints to the Fredericktown United Methodist Church for its 200th anniversary building fund project silent basket auction in September. The works, titled “The Curtis House” and “Bike Ride” were completed several years ago by Misencik-Bunn.

Chelsea Olms/Mount Vernon News

Chris Misencik-Bunn will also be donating two original works and five prints to the Fredericktown United Methodist Church for its 200th anniversary building fund project silent basket auction in September. The works, titled “The Curtis House” and “Bike Ride” were completed several years ago by Misencik-Bunn. Request this photo

 

Misencik-Bunn donates original works to church

FREDERICKTOWN — Chris Misencik-Bunn, a local artist from Fredericktown, enjoys painting competitively after retiring from teaching in local public schools, and she will also be donating two original works and five prints to the Fredericktown United Methodist Church for its 200th anniversary building fund project silent basket auction in September.

Misencik-Bunn told the News that teaching art in public schools and venues around Knox County for 36 years — 26 years of which were spent at East Knox where her students all knew her as “M” — was one of her greatest joys in life.

“I love it when I can inspire or motivate a student who just feels that they have nothing to offer,” she said. “I want them to see what they can do.”

Inspire she did, with her students regularly recognized in the statewide Ohio State Governors’ Youth Art Exhibition.

Misencik-Bunn retired from teaching around 2005, and started painting competitively in 2012 — the same year her husband died. Her competitive career actually started with a painting of her husband, titled “Remember Me,” that she did as a way to honor his memory. She submitted the piece to the Transparent Watercolor Society of America (TWSA) and was accepted.

 

Chelsea Olms: 740-397-5333 or chelsea@mountvernonnews.com and on Twitter, @mountvernonnews

 

 

 

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