Joshua Morrison/News On Wednesday night, a documentary was shown at Rosse Hall on the Kenyon College campus called “Resilience: The Biology of Stress & the Science of Hope.” Afterwards, a panel, moderated by Knox County Health Department’s Julie Miller, left, including Dr. Jeffrey Northup, Peg Tazewell, Scott Boone, Timm Mackley and Kay Spergel discussed the film.

Joshua Morrison/Mount Vernon News

On Wednesday night, a documentary was shown at Rosse Hall on the Kenyon College campus called “Resilience: The Biology of Stress & the Science of Hope.” Afterwards, a panel, moderated by Knox County Health Department’s Julie Miller, left, including Dr. Jeffrey Northup, Peg Tazewell, Scott Boone, Timm Mackley and Kay Spergel discussed the film. Request this photo

 

GAMBIER — Childhood is not a time of joy and innocence for many, and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are common across social and economic lines.

The film “Resilience: The Biology of Stress and the Science of Hope,” shown Wednesday as part of the two-day 2017 Knox Addiction Conference, discusses how those adverse experiences and prolonged childhood stress can literally alter brain development and have lifelong effects on one’s health and behavior.

Scientific studies have shown that ACEs, such as witnessing or being a victim of domestic violence or sexual assault, are the roots of adult diseases such as heart disease, cancer, obesity, depression, substance abuse and addiction. The film highlighted the urgent need for early intervention, inter-generational strategies and multiple supportive systems to mitigate the effects of ACEs. It also emphasized that ACEs cause serious public health issues that communities must come together to address.

 

Pam Schehl: 740-397-5333 or pschehl@mountvernonnews.com and on Twitter, @mountvernonnews

 

 

 

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