Mount Vernon News
 
 
Sarah Goslee-Reed, center, and her husband Larry Reed, behind her, carry eggs, cheese and cashew butter to the check-out counter at Harvest@TheWoodward on Friday, the new local foods store. Patrick Crow Jr. inputs new items to the register computer just in time for customers’ purchases.
Sarah Goslee-Reed, center, and her husband Larry Reed, behind her, carry eggs, cheese and cashew butter to the check-out counter at Harvest@TheWoodward on Friday, the new local foods store. Patrick Crow Jr. inputs new items to the register computer just in time for customers’ purchases. (Photo by Rhonda Bletner) View Image

By Mount Vernon News
November 24, 2012 6:34 am EST

 

MOUNT VERNON — Harvest@TheWoodward opened Friday at 107 S. Main St. and seems to be just what many local shoppers were looking for — fresh, local foods, available locally. The local food store is an extension of the season farmer’s market, but now some local foods will be available all year. Shoppers arrived early and opening business was brisk.

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Harvest@TheWoodward teamed up with the Shoppe at the Woodward to move to the former site of the Knox County Convention & Visitors Bureau. The CVB moved to the second floor but brochures and tourism information are located at the front of the store for public availability.

Cheryl McKee manages the Mount Vernon Farmer’s Market and she will also manage Harvest@TheWoodward. Lisa Blubaugh continues as manager of the Shoppe@TheWoodward.

Visitors walked into the Shoppe and found many gift ideas including locally made handbags, woodcrafts and jewelry. The Shoppe and Harvest store will expand quickly as more inventory arrives including some newly arrived Christmas items.

As a matter of fact, early shoppers missed the arrival of fresh beets, turnips, sunchokes and leafy greens when they were brought in by Heritage Harvest Farm of northern Morrow County.

“Some cold-weather greens hold up through frost,”

noted farm co-owner Matt Gompf, “but we also use hoop houses.”

Gompf and his wife, Corinne, have been raising market produce for two years but have separately, and then together, gardened for much longer. They also package spice mixes and a wide variety of other products.

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