Mount Vernon News
 
 
Homeowner Francis Flood in Millwood has reported damage to his property following recent sewer installation and excavation work. Pictured are what Flood claims is a soil erosion line near the house’s foundation and a section of the house which has shifted by as much as 3 inches. Deliberations are currently ongoing between Flood’s attorney and Knox County Assistant Prosecutor Chip McConville.
Homeowner Francis Flood in Millwood has reported damage to his property following recent sewer installation and excavation work. Pictured are what Flood claims is a soil erosion line near the house’s foundation and a section of the house which has shifted by as much as 3 inches. Deliberations are currently ongoing between Flood’s attorney and Knox County Assistant Prosecutor Chip McConville. (Photo by Alan Reed)

By Mount Vernon News
July 27, 2012 12:28 pm EDT

 

MILLWOOD — A project which was intended to bring mandatory public sewer service to Millwood village residents has turned into a huge headache at one location, according to Millwood resident Francis Flood.

Administered by the Knox County Commissioners with Elite Excavating serving as general contractor and ADR and Associates as the project engineer, the sewer project was recently completed which included laying a sewer line through town with a tap-in at each residential location. But Flood contends that extensive excavation performed at his property, which included sinking a grinder pump underground, has done irreparable damage to his house and landscape and believes it may also lead to more disastrous consequences.

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The sewer project began in October 2011 and finished in March 2012 with Flood’s house being among the final tap-ins completed.

Having lived in this house for the past 12 years, Flood was told that a grinder pump would have to be installed on his lot which is situated along a creek bank and now sits only a few feet from his house. “They had to dig the hole four times before they finally got it right and took out about 30 to 40 feet of trees and brush along the hillside,” said Flood. “That’s what holds my back yard in.”

When Flood assumed the workers would come back and landscape the creekbank, he claimed the area was just seeded for grass and had straw put down. “The whole back of the house then started vibrating and shifting from the equipment,” said Flood, who said the workers became upset when he started asking questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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