Mount Vernon News
 
 
People participating in the ribbon cutting ceremony on Mount Vernon Avenue on Tuesday included, from left, Police Chief Mike Merrilees, Joel Daniels from COTC, City Councilman Sam Barone, Councilman John Fair, Mount Vernon Board of Education member Jody Goetzman, Council member Nancy Vail, Mayor Richard Mavis, Ariel Foundation President Karen Buchwald Wright, Ariel Foundation Director Jan Reynolds, City Auditor Terry Scott, City Council member Susan Kahrl,  Board of Education member Paula Barone, school superintendent Steve Short and Mount Vernon Parks Director Geoff Oliver.
People participating in the ribbon cutting ceremony on Mount Vernon Avenue on Tuesday included, from left, Police Chief Mike Merrilees, Joel Daniels from COTC, City Councilman Sam Barone, Councilman John Fair, Mount Vernon Board of Education member Jody Goetzman, Council member Nancy Vail, Mayor Richard Mavis, Ariel Foundation President Karen Buchwald Wright, Ariel Foundation Director Jan Reynolds, City Auditor Terry Scott, City Council member Susan Kahrl, Board of Education member Paula Barone, school superintendent Steve Short and Mount Vernon Parks Director Geoff Oliver. (Photo by )

By Mount Vernon News
July 11, 2012 12:34 pm EDT

 

MOUNT VERNON — With a quick snip of the scissors, Karen Buchwald Wright cut the ribbon Tuesday to officially open the Mount Vernon Avenue/Division Street sidewalk and intersection project.

Wright, chairman and president of Ariel Foundation, was given the honor of cutting the ribbon because it was a gift from the foundation that made the sidewalk portion of the project possible.

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Mayor Richard Mavis said the city had identified the need for the walks and intersection improvements in 2011, but did not have the money. That’s when Wright stepped in.

“I drive to work this way and almost daily I would see people walking along the road. I thought I would like to see sidewalks here before someone gets killed,” Wright told the News.

She noted that many subdivisions built in the 1950s and 1960s were built without sidewalks, but that walks help make them neighborhoods, tying people closer together and making them safer. She is looking forward to more projects involving sidewalks and trees.

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